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Fall 2015

All seminars take place on Mondays from 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm in 3151 Learned Hall, unless otherwise specified.


August 31

Speaker: Stevin Gehrke, Ph.D.

New Fall 2015 students only.

Colloquium overview


September 17 - Thursday @ 3PM 

Location: LEEP2 G411

Speaker: Eric M. Darling, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medical Science, Engineering, and Orthopaedics
Dept. of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, & Biotechnology
Center for Biomedical Engineering
Brown University
Providence, RI, USA

Title: Enrichment of adult stem cells for tissue-specific regeneration

Abstract: Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have garnered intense interest for their application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. Unfortunately, the heterogeneity inherent in these cell populations complicates their use. Traditional, surface marker-based approaches have had limited success purifying autologous MSCs with sufficient cell yields such that ex vivo expansion is not required. Recently, our group has shown that both single-cell mechanical properties and live-cell gene expression signals can be used to predict the differentiation potential of MSCs. These approaches target all cells in stem/stromal populations that are capable of producing lineage-specific metabolites, potentially encompassing a broader swathe of cell types and differentiation states than traditional techniques. This seminar will present data showing that cellular mechanophenotypes are predictive of differentiation potential in adipose-derived stem cells. Likewise, fluorescent labeling of lineage-specific mRNA is shown as a means to enrich for high-value cell populations capable of regenerating a given tissue.

Biosketch: Eric M. Darling is Associate Professor of Medical Science, Engineering, and Orthopaedics in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, & Biotechnology at Brown University. He also currently serves as the Graduate Program Director for the Center for Biomedical Engineering. He received a B.S. in engineering from Harvey Mudd College, a Ph.D. in bioengineering from Rice University, and post-doctoral training in orthopaedic research at Duke University. His research area focuses on understanding the relationship between the mechanical and biological characteristics of cells and tissues, with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system. He is specifically interested in understanding heterogeneity in adult stem cell populations and developing approaches to identify tissue-specific cells for regenerative medicine and disease diagnostics. Recent work in his group has focused on two, novel cellular characteristics: single-cell mechanical biomarkers and live-cell gene expression.


September 28



October 19 - Monday @ 4PM

Location: LEEP2 2420

Speaker: Damon Talbott, Ph.D.
Program Coordinator, Office of Graduate Studies
The University of Kansas

Title: Creative Approaches to Finding Funding

Abstract: Historically, the mission of higher education is to perform research, teaching, and service. Nowadays, it can be argued that finding and applying for funding has become part of the mission, too. This workshop will present ways to find funding of all types, sources, and purposes: from large research fellowships to small travel grants, and from academic to non-academic organizations.


November 2

Speaker: Mike Russell
Director, Department of Environment, Health & Safety, University of Kansas

Title: Environment, Health & Safety Overview & Awareness for academics and research at the KU Lawrence Campus


November 16Monday @ 4PM

Location: LEEP2 2420

Speaker: Danny R. Welch, Ph.D.
Professor & Chair, Department of Cancer Biology
The University of Kansas Medical Center

Synopsis Coming Soon


December 7

Speaker: Rama Garimella; Ph.D., MS., MSc.
Research Scientist and Assistant Professor
Midwest Biomedical Research Foundation (KCVAMC-affiliate) 

Title: The Yin and Yang of Extra-cellular Membrane Vesicles in Bone Health and Disease

Abstract: Skeletal microenvironment is the communication hub where cells interact with each other and their extra-cellular matrix to maintain homeostasis. The mode of communication is facilitated by direct cell-cell or cell-ECM contact and/or through secretion of extra-cellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) or exosomes. Extra-cellular membrane vesicles are nano-sized (30-1000 nm), membrane invested structures that are derived from a number of cells including mesenchymal stem cells, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and tumor cells. Owing to the presence of bioactive cargo i.e. miRNA, RNA, proteins and lipids, EMVs mediate cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, survival, and differentiation, immunomodulation, recycling of membrane proteins and lipids, angiogenesis, and extra cellular matrix remodeling. This lecture will provide an overview of how (a) EMVs derived from skeletal cells play an important role in physiological and pathological mineralization, (b) EMVs derived from osteosarcoma tumor cells are drivers of cancer-induced bone disease, (c) EMVs can be used as non-invasive biomarkers of disease burden and therapy for early diagnosis and effective disease management, and (d) EMVs can be used as an ideal bone regenerative system that enhances both osteogenesis and vascularization. Understanding the extent of EMV-mediated effects in the skeletal microenvironment is important for their application in skeletal regenerative medicine and as biomarkers of disease burden and/or novel therapeutic targets.


Spring 2015

All seminars take place on Mondays from 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm in 3151 Learned Hall, unless otherwise specified.


January 25

Speaker: Stevin Gehrke, Ph.D.

New Spring 2015 students only.

Colloquium Overview


February 8

Speaker: TBD


February 22

Speaker: TBD


March 7

Speaker: TBD


March 28

Speaker: TBD


April 11

Speaker: TBD


April 25

Speaker: TBD


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